Panzer Dragoon Saga: The Weird Stuff

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Bugs, glitches, untranslated text - this page discusses various things that were unlikely to have been put into the final game deliberately.

While the “Secrets” pages cover all the things that were intentionally hidden in Panzer Dragoon Saga, there are many other oddities and quirks that presumably weren’t meant to find their way into the finished game, but which are in there regardless. This page is dedicated to all the little glitches, inconsistencies, confusions and assorted weird things that Panzer Dragoon Saga is home to.

Contents

Into the Void

While you’re walking around the Village of Zoah as Edge, it’s actually possible to cause some fairly strange glitches to happen, although you probably wouldn’t stumble across these effects when playing the game normally. Basically, there are a few places in the village where Edge can glitch his way through apparently solid walls, and walk around in the “void” outside the intended areas.

An invisible hole in Aldo's house.

An invisible hole in Aldo's house.

One place where this can occur is Aldo’s house in the Liberal District, which is on the far side of the area, near the yard where Paet works. The house is built into a corner of the town wall, and you can get onto its roof by going up and around on the raised area to its right. The glitch occurs because it’s possible to run off the roof above the door of the house, then pass through a section of the house that isn’t solid before you hit the ground. If you press into the part of the house between the door and the town’s wall as you fall, you’ll disappear through it; it may take a few attempts to get the angle right, though.

Once you’re through the wall, walking away from the camera will force it to follow you through as well, and you’ll find that you’re on an infinite plain surrounding the game area. You can pop back into the Liberal District wherever you like, simply by walking through a wall, as none of the walls are solid from this side. You can also walk around on the plain, which goes on forever in every direction, but of course there’s not actually anything out there. However, if you run out into the plain in one direction for an extremely long time, you’ll eventually come to another “copy” of Zoah’s paths, lawns and textures on the ground, but where there are no buildings or characters.

Into the void.

Into the void.

Another copy of Zoah.

Another copy of Zoah.

There are three other known places where you can glitch your way out of the intended game areas, all of which are in the Holy District. The first place is the raised platform that Boaz’s storehouse is on, the second is the raised platform in the church, and the third is the small flight of stairs in Vaiman’s house. Unfortunately it doesn’t seem like anything useful can be done with these glitches, so they’re really just a curiosity.

Into the Pit

In the Village of Zoah within Juba’s bar, you can perform another strange glitch on the second floor. The glitch allows you to break through the boundaries put in place, moving up on top of the stool and table. You will ultimately be able to pass through the wall and fall down into an inescapable pit. Once below, Edge will then appear like he has shrunk. Whether it be at night or during the day, the glitch can be done at any time.

If you run right up against the empty stool in between and to the left of the unknown man and Abner, while slowly moving ever so slightly to the left little by little, you will notice there is a point where Edge clips up and falls off the stool a bit.

Clip point and analogue movement arrows.

Clip point and analogue movement arrows.

Edge about to fall off to the bottom floor.

Edge about to fall off to the bottom floor.

Keeping this in mind while running up against the right side of the stool, move left fast across that clip point. Just before, and as Edge is about to clip up the stool, move and hook the analogue stick right and away from Edge very fast. Now do this in quick succession over and over again, until you manage to get Edge up there!

Edge on top of the bar stool.

Edge on top of the bar stool.

Tiny Edge can still interact with people from afar.

Tiny Edge can still interact with people from afar.

You can then just drop off and walk around endlessly running into the background. It is still possible to talk to everyone from far away. Also, if you run far enough into the background the camera will zoom in, the screen will lock in place and eventually the screen will turn black. Aside from this there is not much more to be done. Considering this glitch was discovered by pure accident, you just have to wonder: “exactly what else is possible”?!

Note: There is a similar glitch like this found within Vaiman’s house in the Holy District. While inside, if you run up the stars a certain way, it is possible to fall off and move further into the background.

Special thanks to Exodus of course for this chance happenstance, documented at around 19:40 into this TwitchTV video of Panzer Dragoon Saga.

Lurking Japanese Text

Most players have probably noticed this one, but here it is for the sake of completeness. While you’re in a settlement, you can skip between day and night time by examining the main entrance to the area, and selecting “Wait Until Morning” or “Wait Until Nightfall”. However, if you do this in the Village of Zoah’s Holy District, you’ll find something a bit odd; when you reappear at a different time of day, the Holy District’s name will come up in untranslated Japanese.

Japanese text in the morning.

Japanese text in the morning.

Japanese text in the afternoon.

Japanese text in the afternoon.

Dragon Inconsistency

Anyone who’s finished the game with one of the hidden dragon forms, the Light Wing or the Solo Wing, will probably have noticed the continuity error that crops up in one of the final FMV sequences. The last sequence that features the dragon shows it in the Arm Wing form, but it always shows it as the Arm Wing, regardless of whether or not the player has evolved their dragon into one of those more powerful forms.

The Arm Wing is featured in this FMV sequence...

The Arm Wing is featured in this FMV sequence...

...no matter what dragon form you actually have.

...no matter what dragon form you actually have.

Taken alone, this full motion video sequence might not seem so strange; it could be seen as an implication that the Light Wing and the Solo Wing were only bonus gameplay features, things that didn’t belong to the “real” plot of the game. However, the truth is more complicated, as this full motion video sequence is itself contradicted by a later full motion video.

At one point during the ending sequence, when Edge is talking to the butterfly-like dragon-entity, he floats closer to its strange, dark body, and the heads of various dragon forms morph out of its smooth surface in a gesture of farewell. Among these heads is the unmistakable blue head of the Light Wing.

The butterfly-like dragon-entity.

The butterfly-like dragon-entity.

The head of the Light Wing.

The head of the Light Wing.

Edge’s dragon was only able to take on the Light Wing form if the player collected all twelve of the D Units, a set of items that were scattered throughout the game. The D Units were meant to be fragments of a memory plate from the Ancient Age, in which the design of the Light Wing was recorded. So according to this full motion video, Edge’s dragon did indeed collect all twelve D Units and evolve into the Light Wing, even though that earlier sequence showed it stuck in the Arm Wing form.

It might seem strange that Team Andromeda didn’t produce multiple alternative full motion videos for these final sequences, in the same way that they made different endings for Panzer Dragoon Zwei. They surely had their reasons, though; presumably ones involving budgets and deadlines (or lack of disc space).

The Assassin’s Description Text

The description text for the Assassin gun part, which you can pick up on Disc 4, says that it does “mortal damage to any weak point”; however, unlike the Sniper, the Assassin doesn’t in fact do proportionally more damage to weak points. This piece of text could simply be a translation error, but - if it’s not - it’s possible that this item was indeed meant to do extra damage to weak points at one stage in the game’s development, and that its function was changed while its description text was accidentally left the same. It’s even vaguely possible that the Assassin is meant to do extra damage to weak points in the finished game, and that it doesn’t because of a programming oversight of some kind.

Although this guide previously said that the Dragon Booster has incorrect description text too, (because I honestly thought that it didn’t have a function,) it turns out that this isn’t the case after all; see the top of the Disc 3 Secrets page for details. (Thanks go to Rushifel for emailing me this info.)

Azel’s Coat (or Lack of One)

I’d actually owned Panzer Dragoon Saga for six years before I noticed this weird little inconsistency. You’ll probably recall that disc 2 ended with quite a memorable full motion video sequence, where Azel left Edge atop a cliff as the sun rose over Lake Uru. However, the clip of this full motion video that appears in the “teaser” movie right at the start of disc 1 isn’t the same as the full motion video in the game itself. In the teaser, Azel isn’t wearing her huge Black Fleet coat; the sunlight on the water looks a little different, too. Everything else is more or less identical, though.

Azel with her coat on.

Azel with her coat on.

Azel without her coat on.

Azel without her coat on.

The Title Change

It’s fairly common knowledge that Azel: Panzer Dragoon RPG was the original Japanese title of Panzer Dragoon Saga, which was changed for the Western version of the game. It seems that the change was done pretty thoroughly, but one of the old titles does still remain in our version of the game, in the “teaser” movie that plays right at the beginning of disc 1; presumably modifying the full motion video sequences was out of the question. Also, the game over screen bears the words Azel: Panzer Dragoon Saga, which seems to be a combination of both titles.

The Azel: Panzer Dragoon RPG logo appears in the teaser movie.

The Azel: Panzer Dragoon RPG logo appears in the teaser movie.

On the game over screen the title Azel: Panzer Dragoon Saga is found.

On the game over screen the title Azel: Panzer Dragoon Saga is found.

Dragon Crest Continuity

Panzer Dragoon Zwei followed the journey of Lundi (the first dragon rider) and Lagi (his dragon), in which they pursued the ancient vessel known as Shelcoof, and eventually managed to bring its destructive rampage to an end. At the end of the game, Lagi left Lundi behind and disappeared into Shelcoof alone, and soon afterwards the vessel fell from the sky in an enormous blast of light. The final scene of Panzer Dragoon Zwei saw Lundi venture into the wreckage of Shelcoof, searching for his dragon friend.

Inside the vessel, Lundi found an enormous chamber where a huge circular artefact was mounted on the wall. This artefact bore an image of a dragon, and it has come to be known as a dragon crest. As Lundi stared at the crest, its surface began to glow with the distinctive green light that once resided in Lagi’s body. The implication seems to be that Lagi - or at least, Lagi’s consciousness or spirit - entered into the dragon crest, and slumbered there for many years.

The dragon crest inside of Shelcoof.

The dragon crest inside of Shelcoof.

The Windrider crest.

The Windrider crest.

This dragon crest looked different depending on which physical form Lagi was in at the end of the game. He could have been either a Windrider, an Armonite, a Brigadewing, a Skydart or a Type 01, giving a total of five possible dragon crests and five different ending sequences. These potential differences raise a question, though: which one of these ending sequences was meant to be the “real” one, in terms of storyline continuity?

The Armonite crest.

The Armonite crest.

The Brigadewing crest.

The Brigadewing crest.

On the whole, Panzer Dragoon Saga implies that Lagi reached his ultimate Type 01 form in Panzer Dragoon Zwei, the form also known as the Blue Dragon or Solo Wing Normal Class. This was the best-case scenario of the game, the final dragon form that Lagi would evolve into if the player did exceptionally well. If Lagi did reach this form, the dragon crest in the ending sequence consequently bore the image of the Type 01.

The Skydart crest.

The Skydart crest.

The Type 01 crest.

The Type 01 crest.

Panzer Dragoon Saga is fairly clear about this being the “real” version of events. Firstly, when Edge met the dragon at the beginning of the game, the creature flooded his mind with its visions and memories, and one of the many things Edge glimpsed was the Solo Wing crest. Towards the end of the game, you can also travel to the heart of Shelcoof and find the same dragon crest that Lundi saw in Panzer Dragoon Zwei, and it definitely carries the image of the Type 01.

However, Panzer Dragoon Saga is a little inconsistent about this. One of the final FMV sequences in the game is a flashback that depicts the ending of Panzer Dragoon Zwei, and in it Lagi is indeed a Type 01. We are then shown the scene where Lundi walked through the wreckage of Shelcoof, but here things get a little strange: Lundi enters the enormous chamber and looks up, but the dragon crest he sees actually bears the image of Lagi’s Brigadewing form. To complicate matters further, the camera then zooms in on the dragon crest, but it’s changed to the one that shows Lagi’s Skydart form.

Lundi looks up to see a crest of the Brigadewing.

Lundi looks up to see a crest of the Brigadewing.

Which changes to an image of the Skydart.

Which changes to an image of the Skydart.

Naming Mix-Ups

After playing Panzer Dragoon Saga for some time, you’ll probably notice that there are a few subtle mix-ups with some of the names in the game’s text. It’s unclear if these inconsistencies were in the original script or if they just cropped up in translation, but in order to avoid any confusion a list of them follows.

Pyros and Infernos

The small Imperial ships called pyros, which you’ll fight in the Tower at the end of disc 3, are misnamed as “infernos” during battle; infernos were the Black Fleet equivalent of those ships, which you fought at Uru. Your “Defeated Enemies” gallery gives the pyros their correct name, though.

Raiders and Stingers

The Imperial raider ships that appear in the Tower during disc 3 are similarly misnamed; during battle they’re referred to as “stingers”, which are the weaker fighter ships seen elsewhere in the game. Again, your “Defeated Enemies” gallery displays their names correctly.

Pyros or infernos?

Pyros or infernos?

Raiders or stingers?

Raiders or stingers?

Golia Hunters and Golia Trackers

The names of the two hidden golia enemies, which you can fight at the Forest of Zoah, are actually switched around during battle. If you defeat what appears to be a golia hunter, you’ll find from your “Defeated Enemies” gallery that it was actually a golia tracker, and vice versa.

Enforcers and Gunships

During the Imperial Air Force battle sequence, you’ll face off against a pair of ships that are referred to as “gunships” during battle. However, rather then being like the powerful gunship sub-boss that you fought at Georgius, they’re actually just enforcers, the weaker aerial battleships that showed up at the Imperial Air Force Post. (Although gunships and enforcers behave differently, and although they fill up separate spots in your “Defeated Enemies” gallery, they do look exactly the same.)

Two types of golia.

Two types of golia.

Enforcers and gunships look the same.

Enforcers and gunships look the same.

The Tower’s Floors

While exploring the Tower on disc 4, you might notice that some areas have fairly odd names; for example, there are two areas called “14F East”, one of which is on the east side of 14F, and one of which is . . . on the west. However, the names for each floor that are displayed by the navigator function make perfect sense; it looks like some slip-ups occurred with the on-screen names, but the seldom-used navigator turned out just fine. According to the navigator then, the misnamed floors should read as follows:

  • The western area called “14F East” should be “14F West”.
  • The western area called “7F East” should be “7F West”.
  • The western area called “1F East” should be “1F West”.
This should be called Tower 14F West.

This should be called Tower 14F West.

The true direction of Edge and the dragon.

The true direction of Edge and the dragon.

Radgam’s Lamp

This isn’t actually a naming mix-up, but it’s a script-related quirk nonetheless. During disc 2, if you visit Radgam at his home in Zoah, he’ll be sitting in a chair in the back room with a lamp by his left foot. If you examine this lamp from afar though, you won’t be shown a description of it: instead you’ll be told that “There are tools hanging on the wall”.

This lamp is not hanging on the wall.

This lamp is not hanging on the wall.

Talking to Juba about Jael.

Talking to Juba about Jael.

Jael

While you’re in the Village of Zoah, if you talk to Juba (the barkeeper), you’ll be able to ask him about his bar by choosing “About Juba’s” from the conversation options. Sometimes he’ll talk about Jael, the bargirl, but he’ll refer to her as “Jubas”.

The Forbidden Zone and Georgius

The description of a hellion in your “Defeated Enemies” gallery mentions that “Hellions patrol the Forbidden Zone”. In the game itself though, hellions only appeared at Georgius, where they could be found orbiting around Shelcoof.

The Anti-Dragons’ Berserk Techniques

You’ll notice that the anti-dragon bosses use the same attacks and berserk techniques as your own dragon, but a couple of these attacks have been given different names. The “Blade Storm” used by the Anti-Panzer Wing and the Anti-Eye Wing is actually your Onslaught berserk technique; also, the Anti-Eye Wing’s “Plasma Swarm” functions like your Plasma Vortex technique, rather than your own Plasma Swarm.

Blade Storm.

Blade Storm.

Plasma Swarm.

Plasma Swarm.

Stat-Changing Glitch

When you’re in a battle, it normally costs you one full gauge to alter your dragon’s class-related stats (its attack power, spiritual power, defense power and agility power). However, there’s a small glitch that lets you modify these stats without using up any gauges at all.

Slowly morph your dragon inch by inch...

Slowly morph your dragon inch by inch...

...to score a free gauge in battle.

...to score a free gauge in battle.

Basically, if you go to the type select screen and only change a stat one or two points from what it was when you entered the screen, the change will cost you no gauges. When you confirm the change you’ll return to the battle menu, at which point you can return to the type select screen again and repeat this process. Given how fiddly and long-winded this method is though, I’m not sure that it would class as “useful”; it can only really be done with a 3D control pad too, due to the delicate movements involved.

Outcome of the Final Battle

It doesn’t seem particularly strange that you don’t earn experience points for beating Sestren; after all, he’s the final boss of the game, so experience points wouldn’t be hugely useful at that stage. However, the info in your “Defeated Enemies” gallery states that you should have got 27,620 experience points for defeating him, as well as earning an Elixir Maxis or a Berserk Maxis; this never happens in the game itself, though. Also, it seems that you’re always awarded an “Excellent” grade for your battle against Sestren, no matter how badly you do.

Lundi’s Gun

Another oddity in the “flashback” full motion video that depicts the ending of Panzer Dragoon Zwei is the issue of Lundi’s gun. The gun in this new full motion video, pictured on the right below, looks fairly different to the actual gun from Panzer Dragoon Zwei; this is shown in the left-hand picture, falling out of Lundi’s hand. The new gun is bulkier, more angular, the grip is right at the back of the weapon, and the details of the two guns simply don’t look the same.

The gun in Panzer Dragoon Zwei's actual ending.

The gun in Panzer Dragoon Zwei's actual ending.

The gun in the flashback of Zwei's ending.

The gun in the flashback of Zwei's ending.

This might not seem so strange when taken alone; after all, this full motion video was made some time after Panzer Dragoon Zwei, and very possibly by different artists. What’s a little odd is that the gun is the only thing that looks out of place; the other recreated 3D models in this sequence (Lundi, the Solo Wing dragon and the huge Guardian Dragon) appear exactly as you’d expect them to.

Hellion Glitch

When you’re in the “tornado” area at Georgius, there are several spherical artefacts orbiting around in the storm, and if one of them hits your dragon you’ll enter a battle with some hellions. However, if you tap the A or C button to bring up your lock-on cursor immediately after one of the spheres strikes you, the battle with the hellions won’t load, and you’ll be able to go about your business.

Recorder Without a Message

Early on in the game you’ll reach an area called Canyon Deep Gulch, where you’ll come across a crashed Imperial battleship. If you Access the ship, you’ll be able to take an item called the Recorder; it will immediately play the final recorded transmissions from the ship, which shed some more light on the ruthless character of Craymen.

The Recorder may or may not play sound.

The Recorder may or may not play sound.

However, if you don’t collect the Recorder straight away, but you instead collect it after defeating the arachnoth boss, you won’t hear the recorded message or see the subtitles that accompany it; instead, you’ll just be shown some lines of text where Edge describes the wrecked ship. This change might seem pretty odd, but the explanation is probably quite simple. Each of the game’s discs has a different set of sound files; presumably discs 2, 3 and 4 don’t have the sound file for the recorded message, so the game switches to this alternative if you don’t collect the Recorder straight away.

Lost Text

If you put one of the Panzer Dragoon Saga game discs into your PC and open certain files in a text editor, you’ll be able to read the script for the game, which is all stored as normal text. (Better yet, you can download all of this text.) However, virtually every section of text contains some lines of script that don’t appear in the finished game; there are bits of conversations that don’t take place, descriptions of items that don’t exist, and other odd things besides. It’s clear that these lines of “lost text” are leftovers from earlier stages in the game’s development, and presumably the programmers didn’t think they were worth deleting; after all, these fragments can’t be seen while playing the game, and they take up next to no space on the disk.

One of the most interesting “lost” passages is the text for a book item - the Drone Record - which doesn’t exist in the finished version of the game, but which is all there on the game discs. As well as this you can find the text for three nonexistent items called “Gate Keys”, which were possibly going to be used in the Underground Ruins of Uru, and a sellable item called “Ascuncion Meat”. There are also quite a lot of “near” and “far” descriptions that can’t be read in the finished game, because Edge can never get close enough to some objects or far away enough from others. There are really far too many bits and pieces to list here, but if you have a skim through the text yourself it shouldn’t be long before you notice some of the other lost lines.

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